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Quality Water Filters 4 You Archive Page
Tuesday, August 27, 2013
There has been a dramatic increase in the number of people who are subject to food allergies over the past few decades. The most common problem foods are seafood, nuts, wheat, milk, and eggs. These food allergies affect people of all ages, but some of them can be considerably more serious in children, especially as pertains to nut allergies.
   
In attempting to find what could be responsible for this rise in food allergies, researchers did find a common link: dichlorophenols. There are several ways that dichlorophenols can enter your tap water, and the most common is from chlorinated water.
   
Chlorine is added to water, necessarily, to kill bacteria and viruses. Chlorination of water has reduced the incidence of many dangerous bacterial and viral diseases, basically eliminating typhoid fever, among others. At this point in time, it would be impossible to stop using chlorine to clean municipal water supplies.
   
The problem with chlorine is that it breaks down in the water into dichlorophenols which have been found to upset the immune system, making people much more likely to suffer from food allergies. When testing was done on a control group, it was found that approximately 20% of the subjects had dichlorophenols in their urine, with food allergies showing up in 80% of those who exhibited exposure. The researchers found that the higher the concentration of dichlorophenols in the body, needless to say, the more severe the allergy symptoms.
   
Dichlorophenols can also enter the water supply as pesticide and herbicide run off from farms. This could theoretically mean that even private water supplies could be contaminated with these chemicals, including well water. Dichlorophenols can also enter the body as pesticide residue on fruits and vegetables.
   
While drinking bottled water might be considered an option, always keep in mind that a large proportion of the bottled water sold in the United States comes straight from municipal water supplies. Also, you would have no way of knowing whether even water from a ‘natural spring’ would be dichlorophenol free – there are no laws that regulate the testing of bottled water.
   
If you are worried about the possibility of dichlorophenols being present in your drinking water, you can also have your water tested. However, there are ways to remove these contaminants through household water filters. Carbon water filters will help to remove chlorine from the water and KDF filters are excellent at not just trapping chlorine, but actually changing its structure so that chlorine becomes a harmless substance.
   
Fluoride is even more difficult to remove from water than is chlorine, but new filters, which employ an activated alumina resin to filter fluoride out. Many fluoride filters also employ back up filtering by carbon and KDF to provide water that is essentially fluoride free.


by: Chris Tracey

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Tuesday, August 13, 2013
Nothing can put a worse crimp in a camping trip than a case of gastroenteritis.  It’s fairly romantic to think of roughing it in the wilderness and drinking from that swiftly flowing mountain stream.  Unfortunately, regardless of how clear and clean the water may seem, it could be filled with a number of very undesirable characters which can cause serious illness.  Besides the fact that animals will often defecate and urinate in or near the water, runoff from farms miles away can still affect the quality of the ground water, which eventually finds its way into the stream flowing past you.
   
Anyone who is planning on spending some time in the woods camping should include a water filter among their supplies.  A good water filter is every bit as important as your tent or your food, perhaps more so.

  Untreated water can contain:

  • Amoebae
  • Giardia
  • E. coli
  • Salmonella
  • Protozoa
  • Shigella
  • Pesticides and herbicides

Rather than risk ruining your vacation, a camping water filter will enable you to drink water safely from any source.  A number of companies make water filters that are easy to take along and keep you healthy while you’re enjoying the outdoors.
  • Seychelle offers a number of excellent camp water filters including: 28oz Flip Top Water Filter Bottle Advanced, which is easy to tuck into a backpack; Advanced Water Filter Bag; and the Advanced Water Filter Pouch.  All of these filters provide you with 100 gallons of purified water.
  • The Go Berkey Water Purifier Kit and Sport Bottle make an excellent accompaniment to any camping expedition.  This filter set is highly recommended. Both filters remove literally 100% of all bacteria, viruses, and cysts, as well as heavy metals and VOCs.  
  • Katadyn water filters are well known to campers and hikers.  The MyBottle Purifier Water Filter Bottle is easy to take along, as well as providing an economical solution to water safety.  Katadyn also makes the Hiker Pro Microfilter for longer use, or try the Pocket Microfilter Water Filter, which can purify up to 13,000 gallons of water, for an extended camping trip.
  • Aquacera has the Mini gravity water filter that comes with a CeraCarb filter element it is Highly portable, lightweight, and durable Easy to use and simple to maintain. It removes -Pathogenic bacteria (cholera, typhoid, salmonella, E coli, etc.), Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and other parasites. All types of particle contamination down to 0.5 Micron It also removes Chlorine, Chlormaines, COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand), Lead, Arsenic, Nitrite, Pesticides, Herbicides, VOC’s, Iron, Aluminum, THM (Trihalomethanes), PAH (Poly-Aromatic Hydrocarbons)
  • Sawyer has devised a convenient way to filter water during a camping trip.  The Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter System provides you with 3 pouches, a screw on filter, and a syringe for backwashing.  You need only fill the pouch with water, attach the filter, and then squeeze purified water out.   Sawyer also has the Point Zero Two Water Filter Purifier, which is meant for use with a bucket.  This filter removes over 99% of bacteria, viruses, and cysts, meaning that your camping trip will not be interrupted by illness from poor quality drinking water.



by: Chris Tracey

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Tuesday, August 6, 2013
Most water purification systems make use of filtration media to trap microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, and cysts.  The effectiveness of any of these filters will depend upon what sorts of media are being used, and the micro-pore size of the media.  Charcoal, often activated coconut charcoal, filter membranes, and granulated metals will all be used to remove different pollutants from the water.  While many water filters will have a very small pore size, such as 1 micron or less, others will have a pore size of up to 10 microns.  A large pore size means that more pathogens will be able to enter the drinking water, and viruses are so small that unless the very finest filters are used, viruses will infest the water.
   
All of us are familiar with ultraviolet light – the sun delivers it to us every day.  This sunlight is considered to be in 3 wavelengths:  long-wave and medium-wave ultraviolet, which are what we perceive as visible light, and short-wave ultraviolet, which is generally used for ultraviolet water sterilizers.
   
Short-wave ultraviolet light does not occur on the planet’s surface since our atmosphere blocks these rays.  It is, therefore, necessary to artificially produce short-wave ultraviolet, and this is generally done with the use of mercury vapor lamps.  These are often called germicidal lamps and are made with a special clear quartz casing – glass will block most of the short-wave ultraviolet light.
   
When treating water with an ultraviolet water sterilizer, the water is bombarded with UV.  Any bacteria, viruses, protozoa, or amoebae in the water are not necessarily killed; ultraviolet light rather scrambles the organism’s DNA so it will be unable to reproduce.  Although highly effective at treating water contaminated with microbes, ultraviolet will do nothing to remove heavy metals or other inorganic pollutants from the water.
   
In order to obtain the maximum sterilizing power of ultraviolet light, it is necessary for the water that is being treated to be clear so that the light can effectively reach the pathogens.  Water that contains silt or sediment or rust will interfere with the light’s sterilizing ability.  To get the maximum benefit from a UV system, a pre-filter to remove particles and sediment is required.
     
For those on a municipal water system, ultraviolet water sterilization can help to assure that household drinking water is safe.  Chlorine will kill bacteria, but is fairly useless against viruses and cysts.  By installing an ultraviolet sterilizer, all potentially dangerous pathogens can be eliminated. 
   
In most cases, it will only be necessary to replace the germicidal lamp once a year.  Once installed, ultraviolet water sterilizers can be used for an entire house, or can be placed under a specific sink.  Achieving close to 100% sterilization of viruses, bacteria, and cysts will lower the probability that you and your family will suffer from the illnesses caused by waterborne pathogens. 


by: Chris Tracey

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